Print Page  |  Contact Us  |  Sign In  |  Register
Press Releases
Share |

May 30th, 2017 - Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Supports Stroke Awareness Month and Highlights Link Between Lp(a) and Unexplained, Undiagnosed Strokes

 

Studies Demonstrate that High Lp(a) is a Strong Independent Genetic Risk for Unexplained Ischemic Stroke in Adolescents and Young Adults

SAN CARLOS, Calif.--()--In recent years, stroke incidence and hospitalizations have increased more than 40 percent among younger individuals from 25 to 44 years of age1. Highlighting the growing impact of stroke on young adults and adolescents during Stroke Awareness Month, the Lipoprotein(a) Foundation has issued an Infographic to raise awareness about stroke education. One in 5 people globally have inherited high Lipoprotein(a) - 63 million in the U.S.4 - and are at increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

1 in 13 strokes due to high Lp(a) cholesterol; find out more from Lipoprotein(a) Foundation; www.TestLpa.org

Tweet this

 

Additionally, the Foundation will be featured on TALK BUSINESS 360 TV on American Airlines during June and July 2017 featuring Justin, a Las Vegas-area high school football player who suffered a massive stroke at age 15. According to the National Stroke Association, 15 percent of ischemic strokes occur in young adults and adolescents, and as many as 40 percent of strokes in adolescents are unexplained. Young, healthy, active and fit, doctors determined that a genetic cholesterol condition led to Justin’s stroke - high levels of Lipoprotein(a), also known as Lp(a). Lp(a) is a strong, independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke2,4. Unfortunately, for some people like Justin, the first sign of disease is a heart attack or stroke.

When Justin collapsed, he was rushed to the local children’s hospital where he was kept sedated for five days. When he awoke he was completely paralyzed on his left side; he could not eat, drink, walk or move his left arm or hand. After a week in PICU, he was transferred to the in-patient rehab center where Justin began the work of learning to function again. Through hard work and determination, Justin was able to walk out of the rehab center three weeks later. Today, Justin is an active 17-year-old high school senior. Although he can no longer play football, he is an active member of his high school football team and attends all practices and games. For more information about patients with high Lp(a) and stroke, visit www.TESTLpa.org

Recently published research continues to demonstrate the impact of elevated Lp(a) and its significance as an independent, genetic risk factor for early cardiovascular disease. The study “Lipoprotein (a) level, apolipoprotein (a) size, and risk of unexplained ischemic stroke in young and middle-aged adults" was recently published in Atherosclerosis, the International Journal for Research and Investigation on Atherosclerosis and Related Diseases (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.08.013). According to researchers, the study underscores the importance of Lp(a) level as an independent risk factor for unexplained ischemic stroke, particularly in young and middle-aged white adults. Given the emergence of effective Lp(a)-lowering therapies, these findings support routine testing for Lp(a) in this setting, along with further research to assess the extent to which such therapies improve outcomes in this population.3

Lp(a) is currently the strongest monogenetic risk factor for coronary heart disease and aortic stenosis. 2,4 “Highly inheritable, if one parent had an ischemic stroke before 65, the children have 3 times the risk of suffering a stroke as well.5 A recent paper from Dr Goldenberg of Johns Hopkins Medicine also demonstrated that an ischemic stroke patient with high Lp(a) has a 10X greater risk of having a repeat stroke," said Patrick M. Moriarty, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Director of Clinical Pharmacology, Atherosclerosis and Lipoprotein Apheresis Center, Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas.6

Lp(a) concentrations can be measured by a simple blood test and could be the first step in preventing up to 120,000 heart attacks and strokes every year;2,7 however, it is not included in most standard lipid panel tests that check cholesterol levels.1

“There is a growing body of research that links high Lp(a) to heart attacks and strokes. Unfortunately, for people like Justin, the first sign of a problem is when they have a stroke or heart attack. We are proud to support education and awareness of unexplained stroke, particularly in adolescents and young adults like Justin and will continue to empower patients and prevent cardiovascular events and death due to high Lipoprotein(a) through proper testing and diagnosis,” said Sandra Revill Tremulis, founder of Lipoprotein(a) Foundation.

 

April 25, 2017 - Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Thanks Bob Harper for Revealing High Lp(a) Levels Led to His Recent Heart Attack on The Dr Oz Show

 

Commends Mandatory AEDs in Every Gym Efforts and Encourages Broader Access to Testing for High Lp(a)

SAN CARLOS, Calif.--()--The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation commends health and fitness expert Bob Harper for sharing the genetic condition that led to his recent heart attack on The Dr Oz Show – high levels of Lipoprotein(a), also known as Lp(a).

Bob Harper has high Lp(a) a sticky cholesterol particle in his blood, it's hereditary Thanks for sharing your story

When doctors discuss heart health, they are not concerned about cholesterol itself, but rather the lipoprotein packages that carry cholesterol through the bloodstream. While most people are familiar with LDL (low-density lipoprotein) and HDL (high-density lipoprotein), packages in the blood that carry what is often referred to as “bad” and “good” cholesterol, Lp(a) carries bad cholesterol and other bad lipids into your artery walls. High levels of Lp(a) travel through the bloodstream and enter into the arteries, leading to gradual narrowing of the artery that can limit blood supply to the heart or brain and can increase the risk of blood clots, heart attack, stroke and aortic stenosis. High levels of Lp(a) also increase your risk of a blood clot.

Lp(a) is currently the strongest genetic risk factor for coronary heart disease and aortic stenosis. Unfortunately, for some people like Bob Harper, the first sign of disease is a heart attack or stroke. One in 5 people globally have inherited high Lp(a) – 63 million in the U.S. Lp(a) concentrations can be measured by a simple blood test, but it is not included in most standard lipid panel tests that check cholesterol levels. The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation recently issued an Infographic to raise awareness that a simple blood test could be the first step in preventing up to 120,000 cardiovascular events every year. For more information about patients with high Lp(a) and heart disease, visit www.TESTLpa.org.

“We want to thank Bob Harper for sharing his story and reinforcing the fact that fit, healthy people can inherit factors like Lp(a) that cause early heart disease. We commend his efforts to educate people about the need for CPR education and to push for mandatory AEDs in every gym,” said Sandra Revill Tremulis, founder of Lipoprotein(a) Foundation. “There is a growing body of research that links high Lp(a) to heart attacks and strokes. The mission of the Lipoprotein(a) Foundation is to empower patients and prevent cardiovascular events due to high Lp(a) through proper testing and diagnosis and we hope that Bob Harper’s story will help raise awareness about genetic causes of heart disease.”

 

February 21, 2017 - Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Supports National Heart Valve Disease Month, Highlights Genetic Link between Lp(a) and Aortic Valve Disease

 

Studies Demonstrate that High Lp(a) is Strongest Independent Genetic Risk for Aortic Valve Disease

SAN CARLOS, Calif.--()--In advance of the first-ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day, the Lipoprotein(a) Foundation is highlighting a number of studies that demonstrate the impact of elevated Lp(a) and its significance as an independent, genetic risk factor for early cardiovascular disease. Recently published research has shown that elevated Lp(a) is the strongest independent genetic risk factor for heart valve disease and individuals with high Lp(a) may also be susceptible to earlier and more aggressive valve disease.

“These data demonstrate that among those with high Lp(a), nearly one third of heart attacks and half of all cases of aortic stenosis can be attributed to high Lp(a) and may be preventable with Lp(a) lowering therapy. Lowering Lp(a) could significantly reduce the impact of cardiovascular disease”

The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation has partnered with the Alliance for Aging Research to promote National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day on February 22, during National Heart Month. The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation recently issued an Infographic to raise awareness about aortic valve disease, including aortic stenosis, the most common form of valve disease in the Western world. More than 5 million adults in the U.S. are estimated to have some form of aortic valve disease and some 15,000 die every year.1 For more information about patients with high Lp(a) and valve disease, visit www.TESTLpa.org.

George Thanassoulis, MD MSc FRCP(C), Director of Preventive and Genomic Cardiology at the McGill University Health Center and Associate Professor at McGill University, Montreal, and a member of the Lipoprotein(a) Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Board, has been involved in three recent studies linking elevated levels of Lp(a) and aortic valve disease.

 

November 10, 2016 - Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Highlights AHA Research Presenting Initial Results of Therapies Under Development to Reduce Lp(a)

 

Study Published in AHA Journal Demonstrates that Reducing High Lp(a) in those at Highest Risk could have a Significant Impact on the Burden of Cardiovascular Disease

Lancet Reviews Clinical Implications of the Findings from Trials of Two ASOs Targeting Lp(a)

 

NEW ORLEANS--()--The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation is highlighting a number of studies presenting initial results of therapies under development to reduce Lipoprotein(a), also known as Lp(a), at the upcoming American Heart Association’s (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2016, November 12-16, 2016 in New Orleans. Members of The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Board were involved with many of the studies being presented, as well as recently published studies that bolster the growing body of research that demonstrates the impact of elevated Lp(a) and its significance as an independent, genetic risk factor for early cardiovascular disease.

The study "Estimating the Population Impact of Lp(a) Lowering on the Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Stenosis," was recently published in the American Heart Association journal, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. With potent Lp(a)-lowering therapies on the horizon, researchers sought to estimate the potential population impact of Lp(a) lowering that may be achieved by these therapies in primary prevention. Results showed that reducing high Lp(a) could potentially prevent up to 1 in 14 cases of myocardial infarction and 1 in 7 cases of aortic valve stenosis. The authors conclude that reducing high Lp(a) in those at highest risk could have a significant impact on the burden of cardiovascular disease.

 

August 26, 2016 - Lipoprotein(a) Foundation and European Atherosclerosis Society Partner to Raise Awareness of Inherited Cardiovascular Disease and Support Lp(a) Treatment Research

 

EAS President Dr A.L.Catapano, who has Joined the Lp(a) Foundation Advisory Board, Presents Lipid Control as Part of New European Guidelines at ESC

ROME--()--The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation announced today that it has entered into an official partnership with the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) to raise awareness for inherited cardiovascular disease and the significance of high Lipoprotein(a) as an independent, genetic risk factor for early cardiovascular disease. The announcement was made here at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2016, August 27-31, 2016.

 

This week at the ESC 2016 Congress, Dr. Catapano will participate in a session discussing the new 2016 ESC/EAS Guidelines. Focusing on key areas including risk assessment, goals and targets for important cardiovascular risk factors, recommendations for imaging, lipid control, and intervention strategies, the new Guidelines have increased emphasis on Lipoprotein(a): Lipoprotein(a) is a low-density lipoprotein to which an additional protein called apolipoprotein(a) is attached. High concentrations of Lp(a) are associated with increased risk of CAD and ischaemic stroke and Mendelian randomization studies support a causal role in CVD for Lp(a). At present there is no justification for screening the general population for Lp(a), but it may be considered in patients at moderate risk to refine risk evaluation or in subjects with a family history of early CVD.

 

May 17, 2016 -  Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Expands Global Scientific Advisory Board

Advisory Board to Be Actively Involved in the First-Ever Prospective Patient Registry to Study Lp(a) in the U.S. with Recent Grant from NORD in Conjunction with FDA

SAN CARLOS, Calif.--()--The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation announced today that it has expanded its global Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) to 27 members. The Advisory Board, comprised of the world’s leading experts on Lipoprotein(a), a highly prevalent, independent, genetic risk factor for early cardiovascular disease, provides support to the Foundation’s mission of saving lives by increasing awareness, advocating for routine testing, and supporting research that will lead to a specific treatment for elevated Lipoprotein(a).

 

The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Scientific Advisory Board includes the following third party scientists, lipidologists, cardiologists and healthcare professionals:    

  • Benoit Arsenault, Ph.D., Universite Laval
  • Christie M. Ballantyne, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine
  • W. Virgil Brown, M.D., Emory University
  • John Chapman, Ph.D., DSc, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital
  • Robert Clarke, M.D., Oxford University
  • Tom Dayspring, M.D., True Health Diagnostics
  • Keith Ferdinand, M.D., Tulane University,
  • Steve Foley, M.D., Comprehensive Women’s Care
  • Henry Ginsberg, M.D., Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • Jemma Hopewell, Ph.D., University of Oxford
  • Terry Jacobson, M.D., Emory University
  • Marlys Koschinsky, Ph.D., Robarts Research Institute, Western University
  • Florian Kronenberg, M.D., Medical University of Innsbruck
  • Joe McConnell, Ph.D., Salveo Diagnostics
  • Catherine J. McNeal, M.D., Ph.D., Baylor Scott & White Health
  • Michele Meitus Snyder, M.D., Children’s National Medical Center
  • Patrick M. Moriarty, M.D., University of Kansas Hospital
  • Pamela Morris, M.D., Medical University of South Carolina
  • Borge Nordestgaard, M.D., University of Copenhagen
  • Alan Remaley, M.D., Ph.D., National Heart, Lung, Blood
  • Raul Santos, M.D., Ph.D., University of Sao Paulo
  • Suzanne Shugg, N.P., NJ Cardiology Associates
  • Sam Tsimikas, M.D., University of California
  • Marina Vernalis, D.O., Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Annabelle Santos Volgman, M.D., Rush College of Medicine
  • Robert Wild, M.D., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma
  • Joseph Witztum, M.D., University of California

In breaking news, the latest issue of The Lancet includes a paper from Advisory Board member Børge G. Nordestgaard, MD, DMSc, of the University of Copenhagen, titled “High lipoprotein(a) as a possible cause of clinical familial hypercholesterolaemia: a prospective cohort study.” The results suggest that high lipoprotein(a) concentrations and corresponding LPA risk genotypes represent novel risk factors for clinical familial hypercholesterolaemia. The authors conclude that all individuals with familial hypercholesterolaemia should have their lipoprotein(a) measured in order to identify those with the highest concentrations, and as a result, the highest risk of myocardial infarction.

The Foundation recently announced that it has received a grant from the National Organization of Orphan Diseases (NORD) in conjunction with the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA), to create the first prospective patient registry to study Lp(a) in the United States by collecting Lp(a) patient histories for research purposes. Members of the Advisory Board will be actively involved in data collection and analysis for the patient registry.     

April 4, 2016 - Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Highlights ACC Research Reinforcing the Significance of Lp(a) as a Genetic Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease

 

Issues Infographic to Raise Awareness that a Simple Blood Test Could be the First Step in Preventing up to 120,000 Cardiovascular Events Every Year

 
 

CHICAGO--()--The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation is highlighting a number of studies reinforcing the significance of Lipoprotein(a), also known as Lp(a), as an independent, genetic risk factor for early cardiovascular disease being presented at the upcoming ACC.16, the 65th Annual Scientific Session & Expo of the American College of Cardiology (ACC), April 2-4, 2016 in Chicago. The studies bolster a growing body of research that demonstrate the impact of elevated Lipoprotein(a) and present initial results of therapies under development to reduce Lp(a). The Foundation will be exhibiting at ACC.16 (Booth #22104).

LIPOPROTEIN(A) FOUNDATION HIGHLIGHTS ACC RESEARCH REINFORCING SIGNIFICANCE OF Lp(A) AS GENETIC RISK FOR CV DISEASE

A study recently published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) shows that the current cholesterol guidelines miss 8% of people who have a cardiovascular event whose only risk factor is high Lp(a).1 One in 5 people globally have inherited high Lp(a) - 63 million in the U.S.4 and Lp(a) is currently the strongest monogenetic risk factor for coronary heart disease and aortic stenosis.2 Lp(a) concentrations can be measured by a simple blood test, but it is not included in most standard lipid panel tests that check cholesterol levels.1 The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation recently issued an Infographic to raise awareness that a simple blood test could be the first step in preventing up to 120,000 cardiovascular events every year.

The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation also announced that four members of its Scientific Advisory Board will be featured in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Lipidology (DOI: 10.1016/j.jacl.2016.02.012) in the “JCL Roundtable: Should we treat elevations in Lp(a)?” JCL Roundtable participants include Dr. Patrick Moriarty from the University of Kansas, Dr. Alan Remaley from the National Institutes of Health and Dr. Sotirios Tsimikas from the University of California San Diego and W. Virgil Brown, MD, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Clinical Lipidology and Professor Emeritus, Emory University School of Medicine.

    

February 25, 2016 - Did You Know That 63 Million Americans Have a High Risk of Inherited Cardiovascular Disease and May Not Know It?

 

 

Lp(a) Foundation Issues Heart Month Infographic to Raise Awareness that a Simple Blood Test Could be the First Step in Preventing up to 120,000 Cardiovascular Events Every Year

 

 

                                                                                        

May 15, 2015 - LIPOPROTEIN (A) FOUNDATION TO AUCTION OFF DONATED TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE T100 TO RAISE AWARENESS FOR STRONGEST INHERITED RISK FOR HEART DISEASE

 

 

 

British Customs Commemorating the Gyronaut X-1 With Custom Build

 

SAN FRANCISCO – Triumph Motorcycles has donated a new Bonneville T100 motorcycle, customized by British Customs to be unveiled at the 2015 Quail Motorcycle Gathering, Saturday, May 16, 2015 in Carmel, California.

Triumph Motorcycles USA and British Customs have partnered with the Lipoprotein(a) Foundation to help raise awareness for high Lipoprotein(a)[Lp(a)]. The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation is a recognized 501c(3) patient-advocacy non-profit organization.

 

November 17, 2014 - Lipoprotein(a) Foundation Awarded 501(c)(3) Non-Profit Status                                                                                                               

501(c)(3) Approved

Tax-exempt designation announced at AHA 2014 scientific sessions bolsters

Foundation’s fight against cardiovascular disease and hidden Lp(a) cholesterol risk

 

CHICAGO — The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation has been granted nonprofit status as a public charity under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Service tax code. The announcement was made during the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2014, at which the foundation is exhibiting in booth No. 1086. The foundation is also holding its first scientific advisory board meeting this evening in Chicago.

 

November 16, 2013 - HIDDEN HEART RISK REVEALED: NEW NON-PROFIT FOUNDATION EMPOWERS ~ 30% OF AMERICANS AT RISK FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE TO BE ADVOCATES FOR THEIR CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH

                                                                                        

Video: http://youtu.be/1D3ahEbiLr4                                                                

 

– “How Could I Have Normal LDL -Cholesterol and Almost Die of a Heart Attack at 39 Years of Age? The Answer: High Lipoprotein(a),” said Sandra Tremulis, Founder, Lipoprotein(a) Foundation –

 

SAN FRANCISCO CA, U.S.A. (November 16, 2013) – Cardiovascular disease is the #1 killer of Americans, yet 50% of hospital admissions for coronary artery disease have normal LDL-cholesterol.(i)  The Lipoprotein(a) Foundation is revealing this hidden risk for patients.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Community Search
Sign In
Login with LinkedIn
OR
Sign In securely
Latest News
Featured Members

 
809 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650/995.3242